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Newly installed aircraft arresting system maintains Yokota’s r

An F-16DJ Fighting Falcon assigned to the 35th Fighter Wing, Misawa Air Base, Japan, approaches a barrier cable during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) at Yokota Air Base,

An F-16DJ Fighting Falcon assigned to the 35th Fighter Wing, Misawa Air Base, Japan, approaches a barrier cable during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The tail-hook latches onto the AAS cable which then rapidly decelerates the aircraft in the event of an emergency landing. Certifying the BAK-12 system gives Yokota’s airfield the ability to host fighter aircraft during contingency operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

Airman Eric Christenson, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical power productions shop apprentice, ensures precise spacing in-between cable donuts prior to the certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS)

Airman Eric Christenson, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical power productions shop apprentice, ensures precise spacing in-between cable donuts prior to the certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The rubber donuts elevate the cable to the appropriate height, providing proper distance for an aircraft to latch onto the cable in the event of an emergency landing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

A flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) cable is tied to a spot on the runway

A flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) cable is tied to a spot on the runway prior to the certification test of the newly installed system at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The barrier cable is in the event of an emergency landing. Ensuring the BAK-12 is fully functional through certification testing reenforces Yokota’s multi-capable presence in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

Fire fighters assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, operate the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS)

Fire fighters assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, operate the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) during its initial certification test at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The BAK-12 system is replaced every 10 years in order to remain compliant with U.S. Air Force AAS requirements, ensuring the new system was fully operational and safe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

Fire fighters assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, are given hand signals while they operate the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier

Fire fighters assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, are given hand signals while they operate the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) during its initial certification test at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. Hand signals are given to indicate the distance the barrier cable has to go to be considered completely retrieved. Ensuring the BAK-12 is fully functional through certification testing reenforces Yokota’s multi-capable presence in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

An F-16DJ Fighting Falcon assigned to Misawa Air Base, Japan, catches a barrier cable during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS)

An F-16DJ Fighting Falcon assigned to Misawa Air Base, Japan, catches a barrier cable during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The AAS utilizes the arresting hooks attached to the tail of an aircraft to safely decelerate and stop the aircraft when needing to land in short distances. Ensuring the BAK-12 is fully functional through certification testing reenforces Yokota’s multi-capable presence in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

A fire fighter assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, gives hand signals to the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) operators

A fire fighter assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, gives hand signals to the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) operators during the initial certification test at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The BAK-12 system is replaced every 10 years in order to remain compliant with U.S. Air Force AAS requirements. Hand signals are given to indicate the distance the barrier cable has to go to be considered completely retrieved. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

A fire fighter assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, operates the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS)

A fire fighter assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department, operates the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) during the initial certification test at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The BAK-12 system is replaced every 10 years in order to remain compliant with U.S. Air Force AAS requirements and ensures the new system is fully operational and safe, maintaining Yokota’s multi-capable mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

An Airman assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron checks the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) tape

An Airman assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron checks the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) tape following the initial certification test at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The test certified the stability of the system, which safely decelerates and stops an aircraft during an emergency landing or aborted takeoff. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

A firetruck assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department provides assistance in the case of an emergency during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS)
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A firetruck assigned to the 374th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department provides assistance in the case of an emergency during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. Airmen from Misawa Air Force Base and Yokota team-up in order to ensure the system is fully functional through this certification testing operation. This effort reenforces Yokota’s multi-capable presence in the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

Airman Eric Christenson, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical power productions shop apprentice, operates the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS)
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Airman Eric Christenson, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical power productions shop apprentice, operates the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) during the initial certification test at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The test ensured the system hydraulics were operational and safe, maintaining Yokota’s mission capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

Staff Sgt. Zach Sheller, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical power productions shop craftsman, left, trains Airman Eric Christenson, 374th CES electrical power productions shop apprentice, on how to correctly operate the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS)
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Staff Sgt. Zach Sheller, 374th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical power productions shop craftsman, left, trains Airman Eric Christenson, 374th CES electrical power productions shop apprentice, on how to correctly operate the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) during the initial certification test at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The BAK-12 system is replaced every 10 years to remain compliant with U.S. Air Force AAS requirements. Accomplishing these certification tests maintains Yokota’s mission capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- An F-16DJ Fighting Falcon assigned to the 35th Fighter Wing, Misawa Air Base, Japan, approaches a barrier cable during the initial certification test of the newly installed flightline BAK-12 barrier, aircraft arresting system (AAS) at Yokota Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2021. The tail-hook latches onto the AAS cable which then rapidly decelerates the aircraft in the event of an emergency landing. Certifying the BAK-12 system gives Yokota’s airfield the ability to host fighter aircraft during contingency operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Gabrielle Spalding)

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