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JTACs integrate with 16th Weapons Squadron in close-air support exercise

Two F-16s fly over mountain.

Two F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jets assigned to the 16th Weapons Squadron fly over the Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Oct. 8, 2020. The F-16s participated in an exercise during the close air support phase of their U.S. Air Force Weapons School, Weapons Instructor Course. Graduates of this course become experts in F-16 tactics, techniques, procedures and integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

JTAC rides in vehicle.

A Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC) rides in an all-terrain military vehicle on the Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Oct. 8, 2020. JTACs supported the 16th Weapons Squadron during their Close-Air Support (CAS) phase of their Weapons Instructor Course. CAS is air action against hostile targets that are in close proximity to friendly forces, and requires detailed integration of each air mission with the fire and movement of those forces (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

Airmen walk up a hill.

Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTAC) walk up a road on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), Nevada, Oct. 8, 2020. The NTTR supports the Department of Defense’s (DoD) advanced composite force training, tactics development and electronic combat testing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

F-16 flies over range.

An F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet assigned to the 16th Weapons Squadron fly over the Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Oct. 8, 2020. The USAFWS teaches graduate-level instructor courses that provide advanced training in weapons and tactics employment to officers and enlisted specialists of combat and mobility air forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

Airman climb hill.

Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTAC) climb a hill on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), Nevada, Oct. 8, 2020. The NTTR provides warfighters a flexible, realistic and multi-dimensional battlespace to conduct testing, tactics, development, and advanced training in support of U.S. national interests. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

Airman stands on hill and looks out on range.

A Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC) watches target strikes on the Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Oct. 8, 20120. JTACs coordinated close-air support with the F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jets assigned to the 16th Weapons Squadron, who dropped 500-pound laser guided bombs (GBU-12) on targets. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

F-16 flies over mountain.

An F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet assigned to the 16th Weapons Squadron flies over the Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, during a Weapons Instructor Course (WIC) exercise, Oct. 8, 2020. This five-and-a-half-month WIC is one of two yearly courses at the F-16 Weapons school that graduates the top five percent of F-16 pilots in the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

Airmen stand on hill.

Joint Terminal Attack Controllers (JTAC) coordinate air strikes during an exercise on the Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Oct. 8, 2020. JTACs direct the action of combat aircraft engaged in close-air support and other offensive air operations from a forward position. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE -- Two F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jets assigned to the 16th Weapons Squadron fly over the Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada, Oct. 8, 2020. The F-16s participated in an exercise during the close air support phase of their U.S. Air Force Weapons School, Weapons Instructor Course. Graduates of this course become experts in F-16 tactics, techniques, procedures and integration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Dwane R. Young)

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