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'Ghost-painted' F-16 takes to the sky

Lt. Col. Beau Wilkins, 514th Flight Test Squadron, prepares to launch an F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

Air Force Reserve Lt. Col. Beau Wilkins, 514th Flight Test Squadron, prepares to launch an F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. The 576th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron painted the jet at the request of the 64th Aggressor Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, that participates in training with Air Force and other aviation branches during Red Flag exercises. The paint scheme is intended to replicate an adversary’s fighter jet. United States, allied, and partner-nation aircrews routinely train against accurate and realistic threats including aircraft painted to replicate those pilots might see in aerial combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

A maintainer and a pilot with the 514th Flight Test Squadron prepare to launch an F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

A maintainer and a pilot with the 514th Flight Test Squadron prepare to launch an F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. The 576th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron painted the jet at the request of the 64th Aggressor Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, that participates in training with Air Force and other aviation branches during Red Flag exercises. The paint scheme is intended to replicate an adversary’s fighter jet. United States, allied, and partner-nation aircrews routinely train against accurate and realistic threats including aircraft painted to replicate those pilots might see in aerial combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme sits on a ramp at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme sits on a ramp at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. The 576th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron painted the jet at the request of the 64th Aggressor Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, that participates in training with Air Force and other aviation branches during Red Flag exercises. The paint scheme is intended to replicate an adversary’s fighter jet. United States, allied, and partner-nation aircrews routinely train against accurate and realistic threats including aircraft painted to replicate those pilots might see in aerial combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

Detail shown of an F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

Detail shown of an F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme at Hill Air Force Base, Utah, June 3, 2020. The 576th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron painted the jet at the request of the 64th Aggressor Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, that participates in training with Air Force and other aviation branches during Red Flag exercises. The paint scheme is intended to replicate an adversary’s fighter jet. United States, allied, and partner-nation aircrews routinely train against accurate and realistic threats including aircraft painted to replicate those pilots might see in aerial combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme departs Hill Air Force Base, Utah, for Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., June 3, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme departs Hill Air Force Base, Utah, for Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., June 3, 2020. The 576th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron painted the jet at the request of the 64th Aggressor Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, that participates in training with Air Force and other aviation branches during Red Flag exercises. The paint scheme is intended to replicate an adversary’s fighter jet. United States, allied, and partner-nation aircrews routinely train against accurate and realistic threats including aircraft painted to replicate those pilots might see in aerial combat. (U.S. Air Force photo by R. Nial Bradshaw)

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