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99th CES, local fire department battle simulated aircraft fire

Senior Airman Dalton Kendall, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, catches his breath after conducting a firefighter training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Kendall was one of more than a dozen Nellis, Creech and Clark County firefighters to participate in the training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

Senior Airman Dalton Kendall, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, catches his breath after conducting a firefighter training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Kendall was one of more than a dozen Nellis, Creech and Clark County firefighters to participate in the training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

Staff Sgt. Brice Haylett, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, catches his breath before instructing his team on proper firefighting procedures during a training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. More than a dozen firefighters from Nellis, Creech and Clark County Fire Departments participated in the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

Staff Sgt. Brice Haylett, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, catches his breath before instructing his team on proper firefighting procedures during a training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. More than a dozen firefighters from Nellis, Creech and Clark County Fire Departments participated in the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

Firefighters assigned to the 99th Civil Engineer Squadron go over safety precautions before an exterior frontal training exercise at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct 24, 2018. The purpose of the training is to ensure that personnel are trained in case of a fire emergency or aircraft crash in a multitude of different situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Firefighters assigned to the 99th Civil Engineer Squadron go over safety precautions before an exterior frontal training exercise at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct 24, 2018. The purpose of the training is to ensure that personnel are trained in case of a fire emergency or aircraft crash in a multitude of different situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Staff Sgt. Edward Wooten, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, prepares to roll up a fire hose at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct 24, 2018. Primarily Nellis/Creech fire departments participate in the annual training together, but local fire departments from around Las Vegas may also participate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Staff Sgt. Edward Wooten, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, prepares to roll up a fire hose at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct 24, 2018. Primarily Nellis/Creech fire departments participate in the annual training together, but local fire departments from around Las Vegas may also participate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Lt. Andrew Anderson, 99th Civil Engineer firefighter, tests his fire hose during an exterior rear aircraft training at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Oct 22, 2018. Airport and rescue fire fighting vehicles are designed to disperse around 2,000 gallons per minute. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Lt. Andrew Anderson, 99th Civil Engineer firefighter, tests his fire hose during an exterior rear aircraft training at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Oct 22, 2018. Airport and rescue fire fighting vehicles are designed to disperse around 2,000 gallons per minute. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Airman Nigea Goodwin and Senior Airman Trevor Owens, both 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters, approach a simulated aircraft fire at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct 23, 2018. Real-life jet fuel can burn at over 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit so propane is used during the training for safety purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Airman Nigea Goodwin and Senior Airman Trevor Owens, both 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters, approach a simulated aircraft fire at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct 23, 2018. Real-life jet fuel can burn at over 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit so propane is used during the training for safety purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Airman 1st Class Christopher Stillman, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, uses a hose to put out a fire during a training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The training exercise simulated a crashed plane and gave the firefighters an opportunity to practice fighting aircraft fires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

Airman 1st Class Christopher Stillman, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, uses a hose to put out a fire during a training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The training exercise simulated a crashed plane and gave the firefighters an opportunity to practice fighting aircraft fires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

Airman 1st Class Matthew Trevizo, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, maneuvers a water cannon on his fire truck towards a simulated aircraft fire during a training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Trevizo was also responsible for driving the truck at the same time he operated the water cannon. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

Airman 1st Class Matthew Trevizo, 99th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, maneuvers a water cannon on his fire truck towards a simulated aircraft fire during a training exercise Oct. 23, 2018, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Trevizo was also responsible for driving the truck at the same time he operated the water cannon. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Andrew D. Sarver)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- Firefighters assigned to the 99th Civil Engineer Squadron and a Clark County firefighter trained together on a simulated aircraft fire Oct. 22 to Oct. 24 at the fire department training area on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

The purpose of the training is to ensure that personnel are trained in case of a fire emergency or aircraft crash in a multitude of different situations.

“The training is important for two reasons: to make sure we maintain our certifications and also to make sure we work on our proficiency levels while out here in case we do actually have the ‘big one’,” said Gordon Mincey, 99th CES training chief. “It gives our guys confidence, and incident commanders, confidence for them to actually go into a scenario and perform as firefighters.”

While Nellis and Creech primarily participate in the training, local fire departments can occasionally take part. In this particular simulation, a member of the Clark County Fire Department participated alongside Nellis and Creech firefighters.

“Nellis allows us to come and use their facility, but I was the only one lacking the training so they allowed me to come and train with their personnel,” said Brad Evans, a Clark County fire department engineer.

Training with local first responders gives the Nellis Airmen extra experience in the event there is an emergency requiring the two organizations to work together.

“By training with our mutual aid partners, we ensure that all involved personnel have an opportunity to understand the capabilities of the department they will respond with should the need arise,” said Staff Sgt. James Avdoian-Salas, 99th CES firefighter and NCO in charge of training. “Furthermore, sharing of resources is a vital part of fire and emergency services, as it helps us to improve the quality of service that we can provide to our communities.”

The Nellis fire training area provides firefighters from off-base fire departments to get unique training opportunities that they would not be able to have anywhere else.

One of the main training areas is a simulated C-130 crash that is fueled by a controlled propane fire where temperatures inside and outside the aircraft can reach over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

There are also additional exercises scheduled throughout the year.

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