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NDI Airmen acquire new X-ray system

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection (NDI) journeyman, reviews an X-ray image on a Computed Radiography Flex 2 system at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection (NDI) journeyman, reviews an X-ray image on a Computed Radiography Flex 2 system at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018. The system provides NDI Airmen with the resources necessary to inspect aircraft and machine parts, preparing for future aircraft specific tasks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Maldonado)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection journeyman, carries a Computed Radiography (CR) Phantom at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection journeyman, carries a Computed Radiography (CR) Phantom at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018. The Phantom allows CR-qualified Airmen to test all the performance features of the CR Flex X-ray machine. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Maldonado)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection journeyman, uses a Computed Radiography (CR) Flex 2 machine at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection journeyman, uses a Computed Radiography (CR) Flex 2 machine at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018. The flex system, which is an upgrade from the previous Structurix system, saves images and film digitally, cutting processing times from 12 minutes to one minute. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Maldonado)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection journeyman, uses a low-energy ion chamber survey meter at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection journeyman, uses a low-energy ion chamber survey meter at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018. The meter detects any radiation leaks from the X-ray vault and ensures Airmen are safe to complete their mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Maldonado)

An X-ray indicator flashes in the nondestructive inspection (NDI) work center at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018.

An X-ray indicator flashes in the nondestructive inspection (NDI) work center at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018. The NDI flight acquired three new Computed Radiography Flex 2 systems in January to enhance X-ray times and mission efficiency. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Maldonado)

A Computed Radiography (CR) Phantom is placed under a LPX160 X-ray tube head at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018.

A Computed Radiography (CR) Phantom is placed under a LPX160 X-ray tube head at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., April 25, 2018. The Phantom, once X-rayed, provides qualified 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection Airmen the ability to test the contrast, shading, spatial resolution and numerous other aspects of the CR Flex 2 X-ray system. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christopher Maldonado)

SHAW AIR FORCE BASE, S.C. -- The 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection flight received game-changing equipment in January.

The equipment, which is a next-generation X-ray processing system, is projected to provide the numerous agencies at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, served by the nondestructive inspection flight, with swift and efficient equipment examinations.

Evolving past the previous film-based X-raying processing techniques, the system, known as the Computed Radiography Flex 2, is an advancement from the previous Structurix system capable of providing digital X-ray results.

“In order for anyone to use the system they need to accomplish qualification training through a series of tasks,” said Airman 1st Class Tyler Chance, 20th EMS NDI journeyman. “The qualification teaches you the necessary skills needed to maneuver through the system as well as develop the X-rayed film.”

Following the initiation of the improved system, NDI Airmen have increased accuracy of crack indications, water entrapment and corrosion, enhancing ease of processes and continuing to save the Air Force funds over time.

“Each piece of (traditional) film on the old system needed to be developed and filed away following any inspection,” said Tech. Sgt. Sonny Ortiz, 20th EMS NDI section chief.

The enhancement is projected to save approximately $5 per film, averaging more than $2,400 annually for future operations and aircraft-specific work.

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