HomeNews

Red Flag 19-1

Capt. Daniel Groff, 79th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet pilot, prepares for a night flight during Red Flag 19-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. The exercise was initially created after Vietnam to expose U.S. pilots to their first 10 missions so they would be more confident and effective in real combat. The goal of Red Flag now is to prepare U.S. and its allies to peer-level adversaries in any combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

Capt. Daniel Groff, 79th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet pilot, prepares for a night flight during Red Flag 19-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. The exercise was initially created after Vietnam to expose U.S. pilots to their first 10 missions so they would be more confident and effective in real combat. The goal of Red Flag now is to prepare U.S. and its allies to peer-level adversaries in any combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

During Red Flag 19-1, an F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet assigned to the 79th Fighter Squadron takes off from Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. The 79th FS, also known as the “Tigers,” will be serving in an air superiority role, performing various missions intended to test their job proficiency in a combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

During Red Flag 19-1, an F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet assigned to the 79th Fighter Squadron takes off from Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. The 79th FS, also known as the “Tigers,” will be serving in an air superiority role, performing various missions intended to test their job proficiency in a combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

An Airman assigned to the 20th Maintenance Squadron, 79th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, prepares to launch an F-16 Fighting Flacon fighter jet assigned to the 79th Fighter Squadron during Red Flag 19-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. Approximately 2,900 personnel from the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, Royal Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force will participate in the in the three-week exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

An Airman assigned to the 20th Maintenance Squadron, 79th Aircraft Maintenance Unit, prepares to launch an F-16 Fighting Flacon fighter jet assigned to the 79th Fighter Squadron during Red Flag 19-1 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. Approximately 2,900 personnel from the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, Royal Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force will participate in the in the three-week exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

Capt. Daniel Groff, 79th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet pilot, inspects his jet before launch at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. Red Flag focuses on applying the core missions such as: Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance, Command and Control, Air and Space Superiority, Strike and Personnel Recovery/Mobility and how they work together to ensure success. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

Capt. Daniel Groff, 79th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter jet pilot, inspects his jet before launch at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Jan 29, 2019. Red Flag focuses on applying the core missions such as: Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance, Command and Control, Air and Space Superiority, Strike and Personnel Recovery/Mobility and how they work together to ensure success. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- The 79th Fighter Squadron (FS), also known as the “Tigers,” will be serving in an air superiority role, performing various missions intended to test their job proficiency in a combat environment. Red Flag focuses on applying the core missions such as: Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance, Command and Control, Air and Space Superiority, Strike and Personnel Recovery/Mobility and how they work together to ensure success. The exercise was initially created after Vietnam to expose U.S. pilots to their first 10 missions so they would be more confident and effective in real combat. The goal of Red Flag today is to prepare U.S. and its allies to peer-level adversaries in any combat environment.

News Search

Featured Links