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Nellis Airmen perform hot-pit refueling

Staff Sgts. James Smith and Guy Hinton, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chiefs, and Senior Airman Johnny Cruz, 57th AMXS Raptor AMU assistant DCC, prepared their gear on the flightline at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. They performed a hot-pit refueling where an aircraft is refueled while still running to get the fighter jet back to the mission faster. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Staff Sgts. James Smith and Guy Hinton, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chiefs, and Senior Airman Johnny Cruz, 57th AMXS Raptor AMU assistant DCC, prepared their gear on the flightline at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. They performed a hot-pit refueling where an aircraft is refueled while still running to get the fighter jet back to the mission faster. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Senior Airman Johnny Cruz, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit assistant dedicated crew chief, looks over the fuel line on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. Refueling times can be reduced significantly when the aircraft keeps their engines on. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Senior Airman Johnny Cruz, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit assistant dedicated crew chief, looks over the fuel line on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. Refueling times can be reduced significantly when the aircraft keeps their engines on. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Airman 1st Class Joseph Main, 99th Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, holds a fuel hose on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. This was Main’s first hot-pit refueling after arriving to Nellis around a year ago. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Airman 1st Class Joseph Main, 99th Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, holds a fuel hose on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. This was Main’s first hot-pit refueling after arriving to Nellis around a year ago. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Senior Airman Johnny Cruz, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit assistant dedicated crew chief, watches as a jet gets refueled at Nellis Air Force Base, Nov. 7, 2018. Hot-pit refueling has to be done carefully because the jet is still running while simultaneously being refueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Senior Airman Johnny Cruz, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit assistant dedicated crew chief, watches as a jet gets refueled at Nellis Air Force Base, Nov. 7, 2018. Hot-pit refueling has to be done carefully because the jet is still running while simultaneously being refueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Airman 1st Class Joseph Main, 99th Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, rolls up wiring underneath this refueling tanker on Neliis Air Force Base, Nov. 7, 2018. Hot-pit refueling is required as annual training for 99th LRS members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Airman 1st Class Joseph Main, 99th Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, rolls up wiring underneath this refueling tanker on Neliis Air Force Base, Nov. 7, 2018. Hot-pit refueling is required as annual training for 99th LRS members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Staff Sgt. Guy Hinton, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit Dedicated Crew Chief, directs a F-22 Raptor fighter jet at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. The 57th AMXS accomplishes on-equipment maintenance to include aircraft servicing, before and after flight inspections, launch and recovery, munitions loading and accomplishment of schedule/unscheduled maintenance requirements.(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Staff Sgt. Guy Hinton, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit Dedicated Crew Chief, directs a F-22 Raptor fighter jet at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 7, 2018. The 57th AMXS accomplishes on-equipment maintenance to include aircraft servicing, before and after flight inspections, launch and recovery, munitions loading and accomplishment of schedule/unscheduled maintenance requirements.(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Staff Sgt. Guy Hinton, F-22 Raptor fighter jet dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, speaks to the pilot of a F-22 Raptor fighter jet on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 5, 2018. The refueling was performed on the 3rd bombing pad due to the dangers of performing a hot-pit refueling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

Staff Sgt. Guy Hinton, F-22 Raptor fighter jet dedicated crew chief assigned to the 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, speaks to the pilot of a F-22 Raptor fighter jet on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 5, 2018. The refueling was performed on the 3rd bombing pad due to the dangers of performing a hot-pit refueling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Bryan T. Guthrie)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. --

Airmen from the 99th Logistics Readiness Squadron and Raptor Aircraft Maintenance Unit performed a hot-pit refueling at Nellis Air Force Base, Nov. 7.

Hot-pit refueling is when an aircraft is refueled while keeping the aircraft running.

This refueling is important because it expedites the process. When there is no in-air refueling option available, landing the aircraft and refueling it while it is still running is the second best option to get that aircraft back to the fight.

The ability to generate more sorties in a shorter amount of time increases a squadrons combat capability and Air Force more lethality.

 

 

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