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New JTAC training facility opens at Nellis

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev.-- The Nellis Joint Terminal Attack Controller Simulation Facility opened for its first class Oct. 15. The simulation facility provides the space and latest simulation technology to train Airmen properly for the JTAC mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael Charles)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev.-- The Nellis Joint Terminal Attack Controller Simulation Facility opened for its first class Oct. 15. The simulation facility provides the space and latest simulation technology to train Airmen properly for the JTAC mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michael Charles)

NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. -- The Nellis Joint Terminal Attack Controller Simulation Facility opened for its first class Oct. 15.

Class 11-1 was the first class to use the facility, which is located near the Tyndall Rd. gate, for the simulation portion of its Joint Terminal Attack Controller Qualification Course. The JTACQC helps each Airman develop concepts, doctrine, procedures and techniques for utilizing combat firepower during joint operations.

The simulation facility provides the space and latest simulation technology to train Airmen properly for the JTAC mission.

"The new Joint Tactical Controller simulation facility is a great tool to make sure our Airmen demonstrate an ability to operate live aircraft before they actually do it," said Tech. Sgt. James Spreter, 6th Combat Training Squadron JTACQC instructor.

The facility's construction began earlier in the year and was completed at the end of September. Although the training simulation facility is in a separate location from the 6th CTS, it helps with space requirements needed to properly train and conduct the courses provided there.

"The need for trained JTACs is at a high," Sergeant Spreter said. "Classes are becoming larger and this new facility helps give instructors the space they need to properly train their students."

The facility will be used during the third week of the course after two weeks of academic instruction. During this week, Airmen are given different scenarios and are told to map out the planning and execution of specific missions. They are taught to prepare for these missions extensively to make sure they are ready to handle live munitions in the field.

"In the field you never know what conditions you may face," Sergeant Spreter said. "This simulation room helps prepare Airmen for any circumstance before they go in the field and have to deal with fatigue and weather. If we instill proper utilization into them before hand, no matter what happens they will instinctively react."

"We teach the students to prepare and practice each approach they make for any given situation so that when that situation arises, they are prepared to handle it in the best way possible," said Master Sgt. Tom Gorski, 6th CTS superintendant.

The simulation facility helps prepare the Airmen for the final stage of the four-week program- the field exercise. During this exercise, the JTAC hopefuls travel to various ranges and put into practice what they perfected in the simulation room.

"We go over countless mocks to make sure our students are prepared to handle their duties in theater without putting themselves or the aircrew in danger," Sergeant Spreter said. "The new simulation room helps with this as well."

The new facility will help provide training to JTAC hopefuls to support the air-to-ground support mission for years to come.

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